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Be Washington™: The Newburgh Conspiracy

Be Washington: The Newburgh Conspiracy

This page provides resources accompanying the Be Washington: The Newburgh Conspiracy scenario. It contains primary and secondary sources on the The Newburgh Conspiracy, as well as helpful teaching materials. Use these resources to aid the Be Washington gameplay, learn more about the end of the Revolutionary War, and find useful learning materials!

The Newburgh Conspiracy

The Newburgh Conspiracy threatened the authority of George Washington and the Confederation Congress. Washington needed to decide if he was going to arrest the conspirators or persuade them to back down.

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John Armstrong Jr.

John Armstrong Jr. was the anonymous author of the Newburgh Address, which called for an army officer meeting to discuss grievances and courses of action against the government.

Read more about Armstrong

The New Windsor Cantonment

Read about the place that was extremely beneficial during the Revolutionary War: it was also where Armstrong wrote his famous "Newburgh Address."

Explore the Resources

Click to explore the advice referenced in Be Washington: the Newburgh Conspiracy!

Alexander Hamilton to George Washington, February 13, 1783

Alexander Hamilton to George Washington, February 13, 1783

Joseph Jones to George Washington, February 27, 1783

Joseph Jones to George Washington, February 27, 1783

Anonymous Letter to the Officers, March 10, 1783

Anonymous Letter to the Officers, March 10, 1783

George Washington to Robert Morris, January 29, 1783

George Washington to Robert Morris, January 29, 1783

Commentaries on the Civil War by Julius Caesar

Commentaries on the Civil War by Julius Caesar

Washington's Newburgh Address

Frustrated with Congress's broken promises, officers met to plot potential revolt. Read what Washington told his officers during the March 15, 1783 meeting that caused them to abandon their plans of mutiny.

Read the Speech

Washington's Plea

Washington wrote this letter to the governor of Virginia, Benjamin Harrison, shortly after the Newburgh Conspiracy. In it, Washington describes the situation and pleads for funds to pay the army.

Interact with the Letter

Revolutionary War Timeline

Looking for more information on the American Revolution? Click to explore a timeline outlining the specific events happening before and after the Newburgh Conspiracy.

View the Timeline

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