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Be Washington™: The Genet Affair

Be Washington: The Genet Affair

This page provides resources accompanying the Be Washington: The Genet Affair scenario. It contains primary and secondary sources on the Genet Affair, as well as helpful teaching materials. Use these resources to aid the Be Washington gameplay, learn more about Washington's presidency, and find useful learning materials!

The Genet Affair

The Genet Affair put the neutrality of the United States in jeopardy. American citizens were serving on French privateer ships that attacked the British. Washington was stuck - would he support the French allies, or stay firm in neutrality?

Read about the Genet Affair

Citizen Genet

On April 8, the French Ambassador Citizen Genet landed in South Carolina and started convincing American citizens to aid French ships. He believed this was acceptable under the Treaty of Alliance signed between the United States and France.

Read about Genet

Neutrality Proclamation

Shortly after learning of Genet's actions, Washington issued another statement of neutrality. He warned American citizens that America would not protect them if they choose to fight in a foreign war.

Read about the Neutrality Proclamation

Click to explore the advice referenced in Be Washington: The Genet Affair!

Treaty of Amity and Commerce Between the United States and France

Treaty of Amity and Commerce Between the United States and France

"Helvidius" Letter Number 2, August 31, 1793

"Helvidius" Letter Number 2, August 31, 1793

Edmund Randolph to George Washington, May 6, 1793

Edmund Randolph to George Washington, May 6, 1793

Gouverneur Morris to George Washington, February 14, 1793

Gouverneur Morris to George Washington, February 14, 1793

Edmond Genet's Conversation with Thomas Jefferson, July 10, 1793.

Edmond Genet's Conversation with Thomas Jefferson, July 10, 1793.

Statement of Neutrality

Washington issued this Neutrality Proclamation of 1793 in hopes that the United States would maintain its relationship with both Britain and France. This was shortly after Genet arrived in America.

Read the Proclamation

The Bastille Key

Washington received this key from the Marquis de Lafayette at the beginning of the French Revolution. The Bastille was a symbol of royal power, and by overtaking it, France was challenging its monarchy.

Watch a video about the key

 

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Washington's Presidency

Looking for more information on Washington's terms as president? Click to explore a webpage detailing Washington's election, cabinet, and crises that occurred throughout his presidency.

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