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Salute the first commander in chief during Mount Vernon's annual Independence Day event!

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Add to Calendar 07/04/2020 08:00:00 12/31/1969 17:00:00 America/Rio_Branco An American Celebration

Salute the first commander in chief during Mount Vernon's annual Independence Day event!

George Washington's Mount Vernon George Washington's Mount Vernon tickets@mountvernon.org MM/DD/YYYY 15

Capacity is limited. Advance ticket purchase is suggested.

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Cost

Included in admission

Celebrate America's independence at Mount Vernon. A schedule of events is below.

Safety Protocols

There will be additional safety measures in place when you visit to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

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Activities

Please note that the interior of the Mansion is closed during Level I of our reopening.

Schedule of Events

Saturday, July 4, 2020
Grab a bite at our food truck

Grab a bite at our food truck

Our Executive Orders food truck will be serving up a taste of Mount Vernon on the 12-acre field all day.

Takeout is also available from the Mount Vernon Inn Restaurant. Picnic tables are available on a first come, first serve basis outside of the Mount Vernon Inn Complex.

Enjoy the view from the Mansion's piazza

Enjoy the view from the Mansion's piazza

The Washingtons treated the piazza as an outdoor room, serving afternoon tea here to visitors and family members seated in simple Windsor chairs.

See the final resting place of George and Martha Washington

See the final resting place of George and Martha Washington

George Washington's will directed the building of the new tomb, which replaced the original yet deteriorating family burial vault. 

Stroll through the gardens

Stroll through the gardens

George Washington's visitors were delighted by the fresh vegetables and fruits from Mount Vernon's gardens and reveled in after-dinner walks amongst the plants. 

View the outbuildings

View the outbuildings

In 1799, more than 50 enslaved men and women made tools and textiles, cared for livestock, processed food, and constructed and repaired many of Mount Vernon’s buildings.

Visitors can visit the outbuildings where much of this work was done.

Pay your respects at the Slave Memorial and Cemetery

Pay your respects at the Slave Memorial and Cemetery

The Slave Memorial is located on a bluff above the Potomac River. This sacred ground was used as a cemetery for those enslaved and a few free individuals who worked at Mount Vernon in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Learn about farming at Mount Vernon

Learn about farming at Mount Vernon

The Pioneer Farm represents the more than 3,000 acres Washington cultivated during the second half of the 18th century. 

Walk through the Forest Trail

Walk through the Forest Trail

The Forest Trail meanders through one of the small woodlands left on the estate, giving you a feel for the natural setting of Mount Vernon when George Washington lived here.

Meet the animals who live on the estate

Meet the animals who live on the estate

Visit with horses, mules, oxen, sheep, and other animals.

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Video


Watch highlights from last year's celebration.

Additional Activities

Mansion Piazza

Mansion Piazza

The Washington's Tomb

The Washington's Tomb

Upper Garden

Upper Garden

Outbuildings

Outbuildings

Forest Trail

Forest Trail

Enjoy the view from the Mansion's piazza

The two-story piazza is the Mansion's most distinctive architectural feature. The Washingtons treated the piazza as an outdoor room, serving afternoon tea here to visitors and family members seated in simple Windsor chairs.

See the final resting place of George and Martha Washington

George Washington's will directed the building of the new tomb, which replaced the original yet deteriorating family burial vault. Today, the wooded enclosure that surrounds the tomb is a fitting space to pay homage to the Father of Our Country and the first First Lady.

Stroll through the gardens

George Washington's visitors were delighted by the fresh vegetables and fruits from Mount Vernon's gardens and reveled in after-dinner walks amongst the plants. 

View the outbuildings

In 1799, more than 50 enslaved men and women were trained in specific trades. They made tools and textiles, cared for livestock, processed food, and constructed and repaired many of Mount Vernon’s buildings.

Visitors can visit the outbuildings where much of this work was done.

Pay your respects at the Slave Memorial and Cemetery

The Slave Memorial is located approximately 50 yards southwest of George and Martha Washington's tomb, on a bluff above the Potomac River. This sacred ground was used as a cemetery for those enslaved and a few free blacks who worked at Mount Vernon in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Learn about farming at Mount Vernon

The Pioneer Farm represents the more than 3,000 acres Washington cultivated during the second half of the 18th century. It also offers visitors a chance to learn more about the lives of the enslaved workers who put Washington’s farming ideas into practice.

Walk through the Forest Trail

The Forest Trail meanders through one of the small woodlands left on the estate, giving visitors a feel for the natural setting of Mount Vernon when George Washington lived here.

Meet the animals who live on the estate

Visit with horses, mules, oxen, sheep, and other animals.

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9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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