George Washington’s Mount Vernon joins Black Women United for Action in remembering the enslaved people who lived and worked at Mount Vernon with a program and wreathlaying ceremony at the Slave Memorial.

This program will be offered onsite.

Buy Tickets
Add to Calendar 10/08/2022 11:00:00 12/31/1969 America/New_York Slave Memorial Commemoration

George Washington’s Mount Vernon joins Black Women United for Action in remembering the enslaved people who lived and worked at Mount Vernon with a program and wreathlaying ceremony at the Slave Memorial.

This program will be offered onsite.

Slave Memorial George Washington's Mount Vernon tickets@mountvernon.org MM/DD/YYYY 15

Special Event Showing On

Cost

Included with admission

Located At

Slave Memorial

Slave Memorial Commemoration

October 8, 2022

George Washington’s Mount Vernon joins Black Women United for Action in remembering the enslaved people who lived and worked at Mount Vernon with a program and wreath laying ceremony at the Slave Memorial.

The Slave Memorial

The Slave Memorial at Mount Vernon marks the site where both free and enslaved people were buried in the 18th and 19th centuries, without permanent identifying markers. Among those thought to be buried at the site are William Lee and West Ford. Both Lee and Ford were free men at the time of their deaths.

The Memorial was designed by students attending the architectural school at Howard University. It was dedicated and opened to the public on September 21, 1983. A gray, truncated, granite column which represents “life unfinished” is the center of three concentric brick circles. The three steps leading up to the column are inscribed, respectively, “Faith,” “Hope” and “Love” – the virtues that sustained those living in bondage.

Learn More

1929 Marker

The Slave Memorial stands adjacent to a monument erected on the site in 1929 by the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association to mark this sacred place. This marker is believed to be the earliest of its kind on a historic plantation.

It reads, “In memory of the many faithful colored servants of the Washington family buried at Mount Vernon from 1760 to 1860. Their unidentified graves surround this spot.” While the reference to “faithful colored servants” embodies a nostalgic view of slavery, the monument represented an early effort to acknowledge the lives of those who labored on the estate.

Slavery at Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon was the home of George Washington. It was also where hundreds of enslaved men, women, and children lived under Washington’s control. He depended on their labor to build and maintain his household and plantation.They, in turn, found ways to survive in a world that denied their freedom.

Learn More

Podcast: Intertwined

Intertwined: The Enslaved Community at George Washington’s Mount Vernon tells the story of the more than 577 people enslaved by George and Martha Washington at Mount Vernon.

Told through the biographies of Sambo Anderson, Davy Gray, William Lee, Kate, Ona Judge, Nancy Carter Quander, Edmund Parker, Caroline Branham, and the Washingtons, this eight-part podcast series explores the lives and labors of Mount Vernon’s enslaved community, and how we interpret slavery at the historic site today.

Intertwined is narrated by Brenda Parker. It is co-created and co-written by Jeanette Patrick and Jim Ambuske. The series is a production of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association and CD Squared.

Listen to the Podcast

Share this event

#gwmountvernon

Login
Buy Tickets Activities Calendar Shop Restaurant Support Membership
Estate Hours

9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

iconDirections & Parking
buy tickets online & save