Label

This receipt states that on July 10, 1789, George Washington paid one pound and four shillings to have 140 of his fruit trees inoculated. Inoculation, also called budding or grafting, is the insertion of an eye or bud of one plant under the bark of another for the purpose of raising flowers or fruit different from those of the stock. In his diary, Washington records the grafting of cherry, plum, apricot, pear, and apple trees. Horticulture books in Washington's library recommended that inoculation of these fruits take place in evenings or cloudy days in late June and early July.

Description

ADS (Autograph Document Signed). This receipt states that on July 10, 1789, George Washington paid one pound and four shillings to have 140 of his fruit trees inoculated. The text of the receipt on the recto and the docket on verso are in an unidentified hand. It is signed by John Marshall on recto. Small partial watermark, bottom right corner; unidentifiable.

The full text of the document:
"Recd. 10th. July, 1789. of Geo: Washington for inoculating 140 Fruit Trees of different kinds? £ 1..4..0? John Marshall"

The full text of the docket:
John Marshall / Recd. 10th. July 1789 / £ 1.4. for inocul / ting trees?

Date

July 10, 1789


People


Geography


Material/Technique

Ink, laid paper


Dimensions

Overall: 3 3/4 in. x 6 3/8 in. (9.53 cm x 16.19 cm)


Credit Line

Gift of Joseph Rubinfine, 2000


Marks

Verso, center, in brown ink: John Marshall / Recd. 10th. July 1789 / £ 1.4. for inocul / ting trees?


Signed

Recto, bottom right, in brown ink: John Marshall


Object Number

MS-5635


Colors (Beta)


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