Observe Mount Vernon's archaeologists conduct excavations to locate and mark lost graves, determine the boundaries of the cemetery space, and learn as much as possible about the layout of the cemetery as well as those interred within. Ask them questions about their work, their methods, and their tools.

Add to Calendar 05/03/2019 12/31/1969 America/Rio_Branco Archaeology at African-American Cemetery

Observe Mount Vernon's archaeologists conduct excavations to locate and mark lost graves, determine the boundaries of the cemetery space, and learn as much as possible about the layout of the cemetery as well as those interred within. Ask them questions about their work, their methods, and their tools.

Slave Burial Ground Archeology George Washington's Mount Vernon tickets@mountvernon.org MM/DD/YYYY 15

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Over 300 enslaved men, women, and children resided upon Mount Vernon at the time of George Washington’s death in 1799. Although we are not certain when the ridge overlooking the Potomac was first claimed for use as a cemetery space, historic accounts from visitors suggest that approximately 150 graves were visible at the time of construction of Washington’s New Tomb in the 1830s. The cemetery was likely in active use for several generations by Mount Vernon’s African-American community through the period of enslavement and after emancipation. Evidence of those graves has subsequently been lost to the years.

Today, Mount Vernon's archaeologists are conducting a series of excavations to learn as much as possible about the layout of the cemetery and those buried at the site. No human remains will be disturbed during the course of archaeological excavations.     

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