"in short the Ministry may rely on it that Americans will never be tax?d without their own consent that the cause of Boston the despotick Measures in respect to it I mean now is and ever will be considerd as the cause of America (not that we approve their cond[uc]t in destroyg the Tea) & that we shall not suffer ourselves to be sacrificed by piecemeal though god only knows what is to become of us, threatned as we are with so many hoverg evils as hang over us at present"

From George Washington to George William Fairfax | Friday, June 10, 1774


Editorial Notes

About a year before writing this letter to his long-time friend and neighbor, George William Fairfax and his wife had moved to England in an attempt to settle some inheritance issues.  George Washington took this opportunity to let Fairfax know about recent political developments in America, detailing the increasing friction between the royal governor of Virginia and the colony’s House of Burgesses, as well as the fact that all the colonies were united in supporting “the cause of Boston” in the matter of taxation without representation.

George Washington to George William Fairfax | Friday, June 10, 1774


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