Ever pragmatic, George Washington sought to surround himself with simple, yet refined goods that would best serve his needs. One such example is this inkstand. Made of silver plate, a cheaper and more accessible alternative to solid silver wares, its neoclassical swags and foliage pay homage to the republican ideals that were sweeping the new nation. The inkstand remained at Mount Vernon until after his death, when Mrs. Washington's grandson-in-law, Lawrence Lewis (1767-1839), purchased it at an 1802 estate sale. More

Date

c. 1785


Geography


Material/Technique

A: Fused silverplate on copper B:Glass C: Glass D: Fused silverplate on copper E: Fused silverplate on copper


Dimensions

Overall (A): 1 in. x 7 1/2 in. x 2 15/16 in. (2.54 cm x 19.05 cm x 7.46 cm)
Overall (B): 1 1/2 in. x 1 9/16 in. x 1 9/16 in. (3.81 cm x 3.97 cm x 3.97 cm)
Overall (C): 1 1/2 in. x 1 9/16 in. x 1 9/16 in. (3.81 cm x 3.97 cm x 3.97 cm)
Overall (D): 5/16 in. x 1 3/4 in. x 1 3/4 in. (0.79 cm x 4.45 cm x 4.45 cm)
Overall (E): 5/16 in. x 1 3/4 in. x 1 3/4 in. (0.79 cm x 4.45 cm x 4.45 cm)


Credit

Gift of Mrs. Lyttleton B. P. Gould, Jr., M. Chapin Krech, Dr. Shepard Krech, Alvin W. Krech, Peter Chapin, Charles Chapin, and Mrs. Charles Merrill Chapin III, in memory of Esther Maria Lewis Chapin, 1986


Object Number

W-2974/A-E


Colors


Mount Vernon's object research is ongoing and information about this object is subject to change. For information on image use and reproductions, click here.
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