You must set your browser to enable Javascript in order to access certain functions of this site, including the purchase of tickets.

Historians to Examine Washington's Military Record

Mon, 10/05/2009

Distance Learning Broadcast Available in Schools on October 29
For Immediate Release
October 5, 2009
Digital images available

Media Contact:
Melissa Wood (703) 799-5203
mwood@mountvernon.org

Historians to Examine Washington's Military Record

Mount Vernon, Va – Mount Vernon welcomes a distinguished group of panelists on October 21 for its next Distance Learning Program, First in War: George Washington and the American Revolution. The panel of historians will explore in front of an audience of local junior ROTC officers how Washington’s leadership was instrumental in securing American independence. Discussion topics will include Washington’s relationship with his generals as well as the common soldier, the British perspective of the war, the turning point at Valley Forge, and the quelling of a rebellion at Newburgh. Students will learn how leadership, perseverance, and team work played an important role in establishing America’s independence.  Schools across the country can tune in to the free program on Thursday, October 29, at 1:00 p.m. For more information, please visit mountvernon.org/learn.

Mount Vernon’s distance learning initiatives take place in the state-of-the-art Distance Learning Classroom, which is housed in the Donald W. Reynolds Education Center at Mount Vernon.  In partnership with Fairfax County Public Schools, the distance

learning programs are broadcasted to pre-registered schools, school districts, and public education television stations across the country. Since 2006, more than 20 million teachers and students have viewed these programs, with topics ranging from slavery to Washington’s agricultural pursuits. For more information about The Fairfax Network, please visit www.fcps.edu/fairfaxnetwork.

Program Panelists:
Caroline Cox, Professor of History, The University of the Pacific, author of “Proper Sense of Honor: Service and Sacrifice in George Washington’s Army”.

William Fowler, Professor of History, Northeastern University and the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati George Washington Distinguished Professor, author of “Rebels Under Sail: The Navy in the Revolution”; “Samuel Adams: Puritan Radical”, and “Empires at War: The French and Indian War and the Struggle For North America, 1754-1763”.

Ed Lengel, Associate Professor of History at the University of Virginia and Associate Editor of the Papers of George Washington, author of “General George Washington: A Military Life”; and “This Glorious Struggle: George Washington's Revolutionary War Letters”.

Andrew O’Shaughnessy, Saunders Director, Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello, author of “An Empire Divided: The American Revolution and the British Caribbean”.

###

Events, programs, and activities are subject to change.

Public Information:
703-780-2000; 703-799-8697 (TDD); Visit.MountVernon.org

Since 1860, over 80 million visitors have made George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate & Gardens the most popular historic home in America.  Through thought-provoking tours, entertaining events, and stimulating educational programs on the Estate and in classrooms across the nation, Mount Vernon strives to preserve George Washington’s place in history as “First in War, First in Peace, and First in the Hearts of His Countrymen.”  Mount Vernon is owned and operated by the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association, America’s oldest national preservation organization, founded in 1853.  A picturesque drive to the southern end of the scenic George Washington Memorial Parkway, Mount Vernon is located just 16 miles from the nation’s capital.

Hours of operation: April-August, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; March, September, October, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; November – February, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Regular admission rates: adults, $15.00; senior citizens, $14.00; children age 6-11, when accompanied by an adult, $7.00; and children under age 5, FREE.  Admission fees, restaurant and retail proceeds, along with private donations, support the operation and restoration of Mount Vernon.